How To: Develop lazy habits that are good for you

Develop lazy habits that are good for you

Next time you don't want to make your bed, dry the dishes or clean the house there's no need to feel guilty. You may be doing yourself a favor. There are legitimate scientific reasons why some chores aren't always the best health choice.

Sometimes it's healthier to not apply yourself. Really.

You Will Need

* Unmade bed
* Air-dried dishes
* Less-than-clean home
* Naps
* Daydreams
* Doodling

Step 1: Leave the bed unmade

Leave the bed unmade. It's more sanitary to pull back the covers and let the linens air out than to trap dust mites under the warm covers, where they'll thrive.

Step 2: Don't dry the dishes

Don't towel-dry hand-washed dishes. Air-drying is so much more hygienic that most restaurants are forbidden from using dishtowels.

Step 3: Clean the house less

Don't go crazy keeping your house spic and span, especially if you have children. Many researchers support the so-called "hygiene hypothesis" – the theory that the bacteria, viruses and worms that enter our bodies via dirt are necessary to develop a immune system capable of fighting back against these invaders.

Step 4: Take naps

Take half-hour naps a few times a week. People who do have lower rates of death from heart disease.

Aim for seven to eight hours of sleep per night in addition to naps.

Step 5: Doodle

Go ahead and doodle as the boss drones on. Research shows that scribbling when you're bored improves concentration and memory.

Step 6: Daydream

Don't feel guilty about daydreaming. Scientists have discovered it's actually a stimulating mental activity that prepares the brain for complex problem-solving.

Americans spent $3.5 billion on reclining chairs and sofas in 2008.

Be the First to Comment

Share Your Thoughts

  • Hot
  • Latest